Fetishes

Sexual fetishism, or erotic fetishism, is the sexual arousal a person receives from a physical object, or from a specific situation. The object or situation of interest is called the fetish; the person who has a fetish for that object/situation is a fetishist.[1] A sexual fetish may be regarded as an enhancing element to a romantic/sexual relationship “achieved in ordinary ways (e.g. having the partner wear a particular garment)” or as a mental disorder/disorder of sexual preference if it causes significant psychosocial distress for the person or has detrimental effects on important areas of their life.[2] Arousal from a particular body part is classified as partialism.[3]

If a sexual fetish causes significant psychosocial distress for the person or has detrimental effects on important areas of their life, it is diagnosable as aparaphilia in the DSM and the ICD.[2]

There are three possible treatments for fetishism: cognitive behaviour therapy and psychoanalysis or a behaviour supervision on proportional timing while not practising any sexual activity for not activating the fetish.

References
  1. ^ “Common Misunderstandings of Fetishism”. K. M. Vekquin. http://vekquin.com/articles/fetishism-psychology.html. Retrieved 24 May 2010.
  2. ^ a b “Disorders of psychological development(F80-F89)”. World Health Organization. http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd10/browse/2010/en#/F65. Retrieved 11 December 2011.
  3. ^ Milner, J. S., & Dopke, C. A. (1997). Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified: Psychopathology and theory. In D. R. Laws and W. O’Donohue (Eds.), Sexual deviance: Theory, assessment, and treatment. New York: Guilford.