Fear of Snakes

The fear of snakes can be life controlling. I should know about these things, I have spent 40 years with a phobia of snakes. So bad was this phobia that I could not be in the room even when a snake appeared on the television. But now I am fine with them…well…most of them anyway.

As a hypnotherapist, and a former sufferer of a snake phobia (Ophidiophobia) I understand that hypnotherapy does not change ones perception of the snake, simply allows you to think of it as simply yet another animal. I can now look at a snake and think, will this snake harm me, if no, then I can, if I like, stay put, if the answer is yes, then I can leave…quickly!!!! Having spent over a decade in South East Asia, I have seen many snakes, King Cobras and Pythons crossing a village road, through to small tiny snakes living in bushes. I know that a baby cobra, some only a few centimetres long can actually kill a person, such is the power of their venom. But getting rid of the phobia of snakes allows me to now understand a rational, and healthy respect, of an animal, from an irrational phobia.

EMDR was used to remove my phobia and so I can testify first hand that it works very effectively. Call Right Track Therapy if you have an irrational fear of anything and remember, you do not have to live with your fears.

Alastair, Owner, Right Track Therapy

 

Ophidiophobia or ophiophobia is a particular type of specific phobia, the abnormal fear of snakes. Fear of snakes is sometimes called by a more general term, herpetophobia, fear of reptiles and/or amphibians. The word comes from the Greek words “ophis” (ὄφις) which refers to snakes and “phobia” (φοβία) meaning fear.

Care must also be taken to differentiate people who do not like snakes or fear them for their venom or the inherent danger involved. An ophidiophobic would not only fear them when in live contact but also dreads to think about them or even see them on TV or in pictures.[1]

About a third of adult humans are ophidiophobic, making this the most common reported phobia.[2] Recent studies conducted have theorised that humans may have an innate reaction to snakes, which was vital for the survival of humankind as it allowed such dangerous threats to be identified immediately.[3]